Locally finite group

From Groupprops
Revision as of 14:14, 11 May 2017 by Vipul (talk | contribs) (Definition)
(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to: navigation, search
This is a variation of finiteness (groups)|Find other variations of finiteness (groups) |

Definition

A group G is said to be locally finite if it satisfies the following equivalent conditions:

  1. Every subgroup of it that is finitely generated is in fact finite. In other words, for any positive integer n and elements g_1,g_2,\dots,g_n \in G, the subgroup \langle g_1, g_2, \dots, g_n \rangle is a finite group.
  2. It is the direct limit of a directed system of finite groups. In other words, there exists G_i, i \in I, a directed system of finite groups, such that G is isomorphic to the direct limit of the G_is.
  3. It is the direct limit of a directed system of finite groups, where all the maps are injective. In other words, there exists G_i, i \in I, a directed system of finite groups with all maps injective, such that G is isomorphic to the direct limit of the G_is.
  4. If H is a finite subgroup of G and x \in G, then the subgroup \langle H, x \rangle is also a finite subgroup of G.

Examples

  • Every finite group is locally finite.
  • For a prime number p, the p-quasicyclic group is a locally finite group. It is obtained as a direct limit of inclusions:

0 \to \mathbb{Z}/p\mathbb{Z} \to \mathbb{Z}/p^2\mathbb{Z} \to \dots \to \mathbb{Z}/p^n\mathbb{Z} \to

where the inclusion maps are multiplication by p maps. Equivalently, it can be thought of as the multiplicative group of the union of all (p^n)^{th} roots of unity in the complex numbers for all n.

Metaproperties

Metaproperty name Satisfied? Proof Statement with symbols
subgroup-closed group property Yes local finiteness is subgroup-closed If G is a locally finite group, and H is a subgroup of G, then H is also locally finite.
quotient-closed group property Yes local finiteness is quotient-closed If G is a locally finite group, and H is a normal subgroup of G, then the quotient group G/H is also locally finite.
extension-closed group property Yes local finiteness is extension-closed If G is a group and H is a normal subgroup such that both H and G/H are locally finite, then G is also locally finite.
restricted direct product-closed group property Yes local finiteness is restricted direct product-closed If G_i, i \in I are all locally finite groups, so is the restricted external direct product of the G_is.

Relation with other properties

Stronger properties

Property Meaning Proof of implication Proof of strictness (reverse implication failure) Intermediate notions
finite group the group itself is finite, i.e., has finitely many elements locally finite not implies finite (or, see the example in the #Examples section) Group embeddable in a finitary symmetric group|FULL LIST, MORE INFO
group embeddable in a finitary symmetric group the group is isomorphic to a subgroup of a finitary symmetric group locally finite not implies embeddable in finitary symmetric group |FULL LIST, MORE INFO

Weaker properties

Property Meaning Proof of implication Proof of strictness (reverse implication failure) Intermediate notions
periodic group every element has finite order locally finite implies periodic periodic not implies locally finite 2-locally finite group|FULL LIST, MORE INFO
group generated by periodic elements the group has a generating set comprising elements all of which have finite order. 2-locally finite group, Periodic group|FULL LIST, MORE INFO
2-locally finite group any subgroup generated by two elements is finite follows from Golod's theorem on locally finite groups |FULL LIST, MORE INFO

Conjunction with other properties

Conjunction Other component of conjunction Comment
periodic abelian group abelian group for an abelian group, being periodic is equivalent to being locally finite. See equivalence of definitions of periodic abelian group for more.
periodic nilpotent group nilpotent group for a nilpotent group, being periodic is equivalent to being locally finite. See equivalence of definitions of periodic nilpotent group for more.
periodic solvable group solvable group for a solvable group, being periodic is equivalent to being locally finite. See equivalence of definitions of periodic solvable group for more.
locally finite simple group simple group finitary alternating groups are examples.

Opposite properties

Dual properties

Formalisms

BEWARE! This section of the article uses terminology local to the wiki, possibly without giving a full explanation of the terminology used (though efforts have been made to clarify terminology as much as possible within the particular context)

In terms of the locally operator

This property is obtained by applying the locally operator to the property: finite group
View other properties obtained by applying the locally operator