Difference between revisions of "Group theory"

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''If you are looking for the definition of a group, go to:'' [[Group]]
 
''If you are looking for the definition of a group, go to:'' [[Group]]
  
''If you would like a guided tour to '''this''' wiki, go to:'' [[Groupprops:Guided tours]]
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''If you would like a guided tour to '''this''' wiki, go to:'' [[Groupprops:Guided tour]]
  
 
'''Group theory''' is a broad discipline within mathematics, whose aim to to study algebraic constructs called [[group]]s. A group is a set, equipped with a binary operation having an identity element and inverses. Groups are ubiquitous in mathematics, and the aim of group theory ''per se'' is to study groups as algebraic objects in their own right. However, there are a number of other, closely allied disciplines, which study groups in certain specific contexts in which they arise.
 
'''Group theory''' is a broad discipline within mathematics, whose aim to to study algebraic constructs called [[group]]s. A group is a set, equipped with a binary operation having an identity element and inverses. Groups are ubiquitous in mathematics, and the aim of group theory ''per se'' is to study groups as algebraic objects in their own right. However, there are a number of other, closely allied disciplines, which study groups in certain specific contexts in which they arise.

Revision as of 22:44, 31 December 2007

If you are looking for the definition of a group, go to: Group

If you would like a guided tour to this wiki, go to: Groupprops:Guided tour

Group theory is a broad discipline within mathematics, whose aim to to study algebraic constructs called groups. A group is a set, equipped with a binary operation having an identity element and inverses. Groups are ubiquitous in mathematics, and the aim of group theory per se is to study groups as algebraic objects in their own right. However, there are a number of other, closely allied disciplines, which study groups in certain specific contexts in which they arise.